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The Indian Sculpture Park of Ireland

The Indian Sculpture Park of Ireland



A journey is a gesture inscribed in space… …it vanishes even as it’s made.  You go from one place to another place, and on to somewhere else again… …and already behind you there is no trace that you were ever there.

Victoria’s Way is Ireland’s only Indian Sculpture Park.

It is a park dedicated to eastern philosophy and art, an unusual and fascinating addition to the attractions of Roundwood County, Wicklow.




Set in 22 acres of serene, undulating greenery, the idea of the park was born to its creator, Victor Langheld, in 1989. In a dream, he saw a park filled with sculptures that appeared to symbolize man’s spiritual journey from a state of non-awakening to enlightenment. Victor was familiar with Hindu philosophy, having travelled widely in India. Armed with sketches of his dream images, he travelled to Mahabalipuram in southern India, famed for its sculpting traditions and commissioned three artisans to translate his vision into reality. The project was completed in twenty years.

A visit to the park recreates an individual’s own life journey and seeks to enlighten you about the true goal of existence. To enter, the visitor passes through a Creation Gate, the birth canal represented as a 35 ton black granite gate, a symbolic return to the source of creation. Inside, you encounter nine, magnificent, black granite sculptures of Ganesha in various poses – dancing, playing musical instruments, reading or reclining.  He is the Remover of Obstacles who helps living beings through life’s many problems. Life’s journey itself is a ramble through an “enchanted forest” where the viewer come across seven startling sculptures, mostly drawn from Hindu and Buddhist philosophy; each sculpture represents a crossroad in various life stages and is imbued with spiritual insights.

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One Response to "The Indian Sculpture Park of Ireland"

  1. Vikas Yadav  September 29, 2015 at 8:42 am

    In India we should have something like this. I am happy to note that in Ireland they have better tradition and culture where children learn sanskrit in India not even primiary school its compulsory. Even 80% of Indian population is hindu…but we lack true tradition and knowledge of our own culture…i am sure when asked about hinduism 90% of them would fail to answer compared to what is secularism

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