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Do you know what`s in your McDonald French Fries?

Do you know what`s in your McDonald French Fries?



  • Mythbusters host Grant Imahara traveled to the fast food chain’s potato processing plant in Idaho to see the production process from start to finish
  • During his investigation he found that dimethylpolysiloxane – a form of silicone found in Silly Putty – is used in the making of McDonald’s fries along with a petrol-based chemical called TBHQ
  • He also discovered that the fries are fried twice – once at the factory and again at the restaurant

‘Potatoes, thank goodness! That’s a good start,’ former Mythbusters host Grant Imahara says as he goes on to reveal the 13 other ingredients contained in a humble McDonald’s fry.

The TV personality traveled to the fast food chain’s potato processing plant in Idaho to see the production process from start to finish.

During his investigation he found that there are two rounds of frying.

He also discovered that dimethylpolysiloxane – a form of silicone found in Silly Putty – is used in the making of McDonald’s fries along with a petrol-based chemical called tertiary butylhydroquinone (TBHQ).

However, he reassures viewers that these are both safe additives used for perfectly good reasons.

Dimethylpolysiloxane, which Imahara struggles to pronounce, is added for safety reasons to prevent cooking oil from foaming.

While tertiary butylhydroquinone (TBHQ) is applied as a food preservative.

Imahara explains that there are numerous steps involved in the creation of McDonald’s fries.

First potatoes are harvested from fields before being peeled, cut and blanched.

They’re then fired through a cutter at up to 70 miles an hour into thin sticks.

After being chiseled into the perfect shape, the strips of potato are sauced with a blend of canola oil, soybean oil, hydrongenated soybean oil, natural beef flavor, hydrolyzed wheat, hydrolyzed milk, citric acid and dimethylpolysiloxane.

Dextrose – a natural sugar – is sprayed on the batons to help them maintain a golden fried color.

Sodium acid pyrophosphate is also added to prevent the fries from going grey.

Last but not least, salt is sprinkled on for flavor.

The fries are then flash frozen at the Simplot factory and transported to McDonald’s outlets across the country.

Once they are at restaurants, the potato sticks are fried for a second time.

The oil blend is similar to the factory mix, with the addition of tertiary butylhydroquinone and hydrogenated soybean oil – a manufactured form of trans fat.

And voila! McDonald’s World Famous Fries are served.

A large serving of the finished product contains 510 calories, 6gms of protein, 24gms of fat, 67gms of carbs and 290mgms of sodium.

McDonald’s digital series ‘Our Food. Your Questions’ comes as the company fights to boost its performance in the U.S., where sales slid at established locations in the last quarter of 2014.

In addition to increased competition, McDonald’s is trying to keep up with changing tastes, with places such as Chipotle marketing their food as more wholesome alternatives.

To improve the image of its food, McDonald’s recently rolled out chicken wraps with sliced cucumbers and the option to substitute egg whites in breakfast sandwiches.

It also plans to eventually let people swap out the French fries in value meals with options like salad or vegetables.




(Source)


Fries

Learning curve: Mythbusters host Grant Imahara traveled to the fast food chain’s potato processing plant in Idaho to see the production process from start to finish

Fries

Raw product: First potatoes harvested from fields before being peeled, cut and blanched

Multi-step process: Here they are seen on a conveyor belt at the factory in Idaho

Multi-step process: Here they are seen on a conveyor belt at the factory in Idaho

 

Fries

Getting the right shape: The washed potatoes are then fired through a cutter at up to 70 miles an hour into thin sticks – here Imahara holds up the fry slicer

Fries

Finishing touches: After they are sliced the potato sticks are sauced in an oil blend, coated in dextrose to maintain their golden fried color and sprinkled with salt

Fries

Almost there: They fries are flash frozen before being shipped to restaurants where they are fried for a second time – they are not vegetarian or gluten free

Fries

Your meal is served: A large serving of the finished product contains 510 calories, 6gms of protein, 24gms of fat, 67gms of carbs and 290mgs of sodium


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6 Responses to "Do you know what`s in your McDonald French Fries?"

  1. Om Prakash Sharma  January 22, 2015 at 2:11 pm

    It does not seem to be healthy

    Reply
  2. Abhi  February 23, 2015 at 1:55 am

    Ok, so whatever be the hell of composition those fries may have..But why is our ‘Sanskriti’ hyping such alien markets in its news..?? I sincerely suggest to better maintain our own dignity to make sure of our healthy standards.

    Reply
    • Sanskriti  February 23, 2015 at 5:24 am

      Alien Market!?? Do you have any idea about the increased consumption of JUNK food in India by any chance and how it’s adverse health effects!? Does health and well being not come under our culture, or was AYURVEDA and other health related Indian scriptures were just a waste? I suggest you learn to understand the meaning of Sanskriti and what is the meaning of creating awareness, because this website and our efforts are purely focused on creating AWARENESS about things that matters!

      Read this to understand why sharing such information is important: http://www.sanskritimagazine.com/healthy-living/the-fat-epidemic-of-india/

      Reply
  3. Arun  April 2, 2015 at 7:47 am

    Is the same procedure carried out in rest of the countries as well, mainly India? From the above article, we can safely say that French Fries is certainly not a vegetarian option and would like to make sure that is the case in India as well.

    Reply
    • Stephanie  October 20, 2015 at 10:29 pm

      Arun, I would ALWAYS assume that the same procedure is carried out. I will not touch those fries with a ten-foot pole! Here, take one, and put it in a screen box where bugs can’t get to it and put it away somewhere in the open, and check back in one year – does it change at all?

      Editor – THANK YOU for writing this article! I’ve always avoided eating at McDonald’s. It’s a good thing because I didn’t know that their fries are not even vegetarian by any stretch of the imagination. This is an example of a society filled with “technically-adept brutes,” brutes who can run machinery, fix them, build bombs, but have NO inner science whatsoever. This is the danger of western civilization – it is technically adept, but at the cost of danger to its manufacturing and mining employees, its customers, and the environment.

      Reply
  4. danny  April 3, 2016 at 9:07 pm

    Sanskriti-thank you can the article’i know abit more now than previously but’Be a nice idea if Mr Imara could show the step by step process of how the meat for their burgurs are obtained and show that to the consumer…

    Reply

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